Tag Archives: authoritarian

Meet Jim Russell, the Eugenics Supporting Racist the Republicans Are Running in NY-18

by john

Update: The Republicans are now apparently trying to distance themselves from this perennial Republican candidate. But they’re sticking with Paladino.

Via Digby, The Albany Project has the skinny on this troglodyte, who just happens to be the Republican candidate for congress in New York’s 18th district:

It has been demonstrated that finches raised by foster parents of a different species of finch will later exhibit a lifelong sexual attraction toward the alien species. One wonders how a child’s sexual imprinting mechanism is affected by forcible racial integration and near continual exposure to media stimuli promoting interracial contact. The most serious implication of human sexual imprinting for our genetic future is that it would establish the destructiveness of school integration, especially in the middle and high-school years. One can only wonder to what degree the advocates of school integration, such as former NAACP attorney Jack Greenberg, were conscious of this scientific concept. It also compounds the culpability of media moguls who deliberately popularize miscegenation in films directed toward adolescents and pre-adolescents. In the midst of this onslaught against our youth, parents need to be reminded that they have a natural obligation, as essential as providing food and shelter, to instill in their children an acceptance of appropriate ethnic boundaries for socialization and for marriage.

The sociobiological warfare that our youth is subjected to is likely to be even more diabolical since it appears to deliberately exploit a biological theory of sexual imprinting at the critical period of sexual maturity. Movies like this past year’s spate of miscegenationist titles, Save the Last Dance, Crazy / Beautiful and O, a parody of Othello, appear deliberately designed to exploit the critical period of sexual imprinting in their target audiences of white pre-adolescent girls and adolescent young women.

There is now afoot a conscious effort to de-Europeanize and to re-Judaize Christianity, through scriptural revision, internal treachery and external pressure.

The importance of applying eugenic measures in the West becomes evident from Richard Lynn’s recent work on Dysgenics and his just-released seminal work Eugenics: A Reassessment. [emphasis added]

As Digby notes, he fits right in with the New York Republican candidate for governor, Carl “All in Good Fun” Paladino. It’s a good thing Democrats, liberals, progressives and leftists are the real racists, or else this could have been real bad for the Republicans.

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The Cordoba House: where do you stand?

by john

The rightwingers and Republicans are ramping up the nativism and other-bashing with what they are misnaming the ‘ground zero mosque.’ Refudiations are in order.

Greg Sargent had a good post yesterday in which he called on people to either condemn the bigotry or be an adult and admit that you conflate all of Islam with murderous terrorists:

The only way to see this as a provocative act is to buy into the notion that the building of a center devoted to Islamic heritage is, by accident or by design, tantamount to rubbing the victims’ noses into what happened on 9/11 — that it is inescapably a “victory mosque.” To believe this is to legitimize — wittingly or not — the world view of the center’s bigoted foes.

In fact, it is not legitimate to see the building of a center devoted to the study of Islam near Ground Zero as an inherently provocative act. You can’t endorse the idea that it’s provocative to study the heritage of Islam in the vicinity of Ground Zero while simultaneously arguing that the bigots are wrong to conflate the 9/11 attacks with Islam as a whole. Period. It’s not a coherent or sustainable argument.

People need to choose sides. Either it’s justifiable to see the act of building an Islamic center near Ground Zero as provocation, intentional or not, or it isn’t. If you endorse the former, you are in effect supporting the view that it’s defensible to vaguely associate Islam as a whole with the attacks. If people want to endorse that view, fine: Just say so. No fudging here. It’s one or the other.

Violent murderous Christian terrorists have killed numerous doctors who perform abortions — should all Christians have to refudiate them?

The ADL squandered whatever moral authority it had left by siding with the bigots and Fareed Zakaria returned, rightfully, an ADL award.

The rightwingers and Republicans see Muslims as the new commies, complete with dark suggestions of nefarious plots. But the American Taliban — Christofascists, really — have more in common with Islamic extremists than they do with the mainstream of American people, and both are very far from mainstream Christianity and Islam. I think the American Christianists secretly jealous of the control over others the radical Islamists are able to wield in parts of countries like Afghanistan and Somalia.

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Republican obstructionism delayed the 9/11 first responders aid bill

I have to disagree somewhat with Jeff’s last post blaming the Democrats as well as the Republicans for the failure to pass the bill. King was supposed to get enough Republican but couldn’t because they claimed the bill was a massive new entitlement program. They were going to kill the bill by attaching a poison pill, an amendment that would have prohibited any help at all going to any first responder who was not here legally.

I agree with those who say that any first responder, regardless of citizenship status, should get help. And the Republicans knew the Democrats would vote against such an odious amendment but they would use that vote to accuse them of giving millions to ‘illegals’ in sound bite driven campaign commercials.

It was really sleazy of the Republicans. King was diverting attention away from his failure to get Republican support by attaching amendments he knew the Democrats would reject. The Democrats finally got smart and forced the Republicans’ hand and called them out for their naked partisanship. Good for them.

In other news, some rightwing blogs and sites are walking quietly away from the bogus Laredo invasion fabrication, while the initiators are still sticking to their story. A post on the invasion appeared on redstate (link to google cache), but was disappeared by the powers that be. If you click on the link to the current page, you are directed to new posts. Maybe this is why they are so hostile to google at that site.

It’s another sign, along with the banning of the birfers, that redstate is trying desperately to overcome Erickson’s comparison of White House health care spox Linda Douglass to Goebbels and the unfortunate tweet in which he called Supreme Court Justice Souter a ‘goat fucking child molester.’

My guess is that they still have work to do in that regard.

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Rand Paul and the birfer/teabagger summer

I don’t know if Paul is a birfer and am assuming that he’s not. But he certainly seems to be a teabagger and the people he seems likely to appeal to are largely birfer/teabaggers.

He says he’s not personally racist, and I’ll grant him that as well. But he supports the rights of businesses providng pubic services — and benefiting from government services such as roads, sewers, police, fire, health departments, business districts, etc — should have the right to discriminate against people on the basis of race, disability, sexual orientation and, it would seem logical to presume, gender and any other reason.

That is in line with hard core libertarianism that says it’s okay for me to sell you poison baby food because after your baby and X number of other babies dies, people will not buy my product and I will go out of business. The market will have spoken.

Thankfully, a large majority of Americans don’t share this (Ayn) Randian point of view. As I have been predicting, these are just a few more of the opening skirmishes in what will be a bloody and damaging civil war among the rightwing Republicans.

Demint, Cantor and Cornyn have delayed with ‘no comments’ today but they can’t dodge the question much longer.

With immigration on the national mind, things are only going to get more difficult and uncomfortable for the Republican leadership. One only has to look at the comment threads in general readership sites, and especially at rightwing sites such as redstate, to see that a large chunk of the rightwing Republican base agrees with Paul and doesn’t like the way the leadership is going ‘squishy’ on the issue.

In addition to the immigration debate, whatever form it takes and in whatever venues, there is also the birfer/teabagger demand for ‘full repeal’ of the hcr bill. Additionally, we now see candidates pulling back on their pledge to the birfer/teabaggers to repeal the 17th amendment.

That’s the one that allows for popular election of senators rather than election by state legislatures. Somehow, the birfer/teabaggers are convinced that this amendment was a mortal blow to the liberty of individual citizens and want to repeal it.

Again, as with most birfer/teabagger policy positions, this one is not supported by a majority of Americans who will be voting in 2010, 2012 and every two years thereafter.

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And now begins the birther summer

The still prevailing narrative is that Democrats will suffer great losses in the fall and Republicans might take over the house and make strong gains in the Senate, even if they might not win both houses. This narrative has been the conventional wisdom for months now and, while it has been getting push back for awhile, it still qualifies for the title of conventional wisdom.

For months, I’ve been writing and saying that I think this is overblown. Yes, historical trends favor the Republicans as the out of power party in the first midterm election. Yes, the birfer/teabagger brigades are vocal and enthused. Yes, the economy is not yet fully recovered. Yes, there is a general feeling of anti incumbency and there are more Democratic incumbents than Republican incumbents. And yes, many progressives and Democrats are less pumped than in 2008.

But I don’t think it’s going to be as bad for the Democrats and progressives as the prevailing narrative is predicting. They will probably lose seats in both houses; but I doubt they’ll lose either of their majorities.

Despite efforts to tamp it down, there will be a civil war on the right. There was a minor freak out yesterday over the fact that a muslim Arab-American won a beauty pageant. It was a tempest in a teapot, but it was still illustrative of the nativist racism that animates so much of the animosity of the birfer/teabaggers.

Even if congress doesn’t act on it, immigration and immigration reform will be part of the debate. This is bad for rightwingers and Republicans because, not only does it alienate latinos and other immigrant groups as well as young people generally, it encourages loony rhetoric, especially from the types of older white people who like to complain in public about their liberties and country being taken away from them and how they, as older white christians, are the most persecuted group in America today.

That’s not exactly a formula for victory for the rightwing Republicans. The leadership knows this, but the base is clueless about their lack of broad appeal.

The base is largely isolated. They watch Fox, listen to talk radio, visit far right sites and mainly only talk politics to people who agree with them. The vastly overestimate the popularity of their views. But, fueled by this misapprehension regarding how many people share their beliefs and prejudices, they are ready to let their freak flag fly.

Like the apocryphal American tourist who shouts louder and more slowly when confronted with people who don’t speak English, the birfer/teabaggers, who are just the far right segment of the rightwing Republicans with new names, become louder and more shrill when they see their message isn’t getting the widespread approval they were so sure it would.

If you thought last summer’s ‘town hall’ meetings featured petulant, whiny baby boomers, wait till this summer. There will be rallies and protests galore. And the anger of the birfer/teabaggers will be directed just as much at the rightwing Republican leadership as at the Democrats, progressives, liberals, immigrants, young people, etc, etc…

When they encounter negative public reaction to their extremism, they will blame the leadership for ‘pulling punches.’ They will get more extreme and the leadership, becoming more and more afraid of their prospects in the general, will pull further and further away. Each factions’ actions will fuel the other’s reactions and it will get increasingly ugly.

And many of their potential supporters will either vote for Democrats or stay home.

Then, after the Republicans under perform, the leadership will blame the extremism of the base and the base will blame the punch pulling of the leadership. The disarray could last until after the 2012 elections.

Now, this could of course be overly optimistic. What if the Republicans do better than I predict, even perhaps taking the House?

I’d still think the base, and in this case the leadership as well, would take the wrong message. They would feel empowered and run to the right in 2012, which, I’d contend, would be a mistake.

Basically, I believe the rightwing Republicans created a monster when they ramped up their fringe base. Whether it’s sooner or later, there will be a backlash against the extremism. When — and whether — that actually happens remains to be seen. But I predict it will come sooner rather than later and that this summer will set off the backlash.

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Predictions and threats of violence are increasingly frequent in rightwing discourse

The usual chest thumpers at redstate are all in, calling everyone to the left of Dubya “evil,” comparing Obama to a tyrant and predicting blood:

The Difference Between Them and Us
Obama as King George III or There will be blood [updated]
Mike DeVine’s Rule of Blood, Munich and the Rule of Law, and the Hanging of Jake Spoon

And Think Progress has this from the Heritage Foundation. After Cantor finished a speech attacking Obama over the failed Times Square car bomb, a questioner asks him why Obama shouldn’t be called a ‘domestic enemy.’ Here’s the transcript and video, both via Think Progress [emphasis in original]:

QUESTION: My question is – and this is something I personally don’t understand – if it’s a naïve question then I apologize: in light of what Obama has done to leave us vulnerable, to cut defense spending, to make us vulnerable to outside enemies, and to slight our allies, how (pause) – what would he have to do differently to be defined as a domestic enemy? (applause)

CANTOR: Listen, let me respond very forthright to that: you know, no one thinks the President is a domestic enemy. (boos)

Cantor is a savvy politician and, to his credit, he denies that the label is appropriate. But he doesn’t do so until after he laughs at the suggestion that Obama should be called a “domestic enemy” and lets his smile linger while the crowd laughs along.

Then they boo him for saying that the democratically elected president should not be called an enemy of the country. Had this exchange not been in front of cameras, do you think he would have just stuck with his first instinct?

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Arizona brings immigration reform back to the front burner

[Updated below]

I’ll resume regular posting, two to four times a week.

Aside from travel and school stuff, I’ve been distracted by the reaction to this video I shot of my mayor questioning Obama’s citizenship at a local ‘tea party’ rally. The rally was in a public park of course and many of the attendees looked like they are drawing social security and medicare checks, but they sure hate government. Except that one of the organizers called 911 on me for filming. She said they ‘rented the park’ and had the authority to kick me out.

A police captain set her straight, but it nicely demonstrates their authoritarian mentality.

As this post at Think Progress notes, the people who attend these rallies, aside from being mostly older white far right Republicans, also support the incredibly intrusive Big Brother ‘show me your papers’ Arizona law:

Not only are Tea Partiers not speaking out against SB-1070, they’re actively supporting it. The Arizona Tea Party Network called on its members to support Brewer’s big government. In fact, the sponsor of SB-1070 is state Sen. Russell Pearce (R), a Tea Party backer.

Why are they so supportive of Big Government in this case? The Think Progress post quotes a University of Washington study sheds some light on the attitudes toward people who are, unsurprisingly, vastly unrepresented at their rallies:

For instance, the Tea Party, the grassroots movement committed to reining in what they perceive as big government, and fiscal irresponsibility, also appear predisposed to intolerance. Approximately 45% of Whites either strongly or somewhat approve of the movement. Of those, only 35% believe Blacks to be hardworking, only 45 % believe Blacks are intelligent, and only 41% think that Blacks are trustworthy. Perceptions of Latinos aren’t much different. While 54% of White Tea Party supporters believe Latinos to be hardworking, only 44% think them intelligent, and even fewer, 42% of Tea Party supporters believe Latinos to be trustworthy. When it comes to gays and lesbians, White Tea Party supporters also hold negative attitudes. Only 36% think gay and lesbian couples should be allowed to adopt children, and just 17% are in favor of same-sex marriage.

Update: Redstate blog, whose head honcho is best know for calling former supreme court justice David Souter a “goat fucking child molester,’ has this up today about how congressional black congress members and civil rights movement heroes were, y’know, lying about ‘tea partiers’ calling them n!gg4r and otherwise abusing them. Hey, if it wasn’t caught on video, then it could not have happened, right?

Bolding mine: yes, you can see for yourself. Why? Because people brought cameras*. Otherwise, this wouldn’t have gotten challenged, and the Democrats wouldn’t be trying to hide from this story right now. And no, this is not something that people should just move on from, either. We can move on after the Members of Congress involved either publicly retract their accusations, or else prove them.

This is just one more way the ‘tea partiers’ are proving how moderate and inclusive they are. It’s just that all the non white, younger, non far right Republicans — who totally, totally exist and who support the ‘tea party agenda’ — for some reason don’t seem to be able to make it to the rallies. Maybe it’s all the angry white people with guns…

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